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  1. What price home can I afford?                                                                                                                                 E-BOOK
  2. How do I find out about the condition of the home I'm considering?
  3. How low can I consider offering?
  4. How and what do I negotiate?
  5. What about my down payment, should I put more or less down, if we can afford it?
  6. What is the irrevocability of the offer?
  7. What steps should I take when looking for a home loan?
  8. Is it possible to negotiate interest rates?
  9. Is it better to buy a new home or a resale?
  10. Fixer-Uppers - Are they good or bad?
  11. Can you borrow the money to repair ?
  12. Is there a good "return" for my efforts?

 

Question 1: What price home can I afford? Back to Top

As a "rule of thumb" you can afford to buy a home equal in price to twice your gross annual income. More precisely, the price you can afford to pay for a home will depend on six factors:

  1. Your income
  2. The amount of cash you have available for the down payment, closing costs and cash reserves required by the lender.
  3. Your outstanding debts
  4. Your credit history
  5. The type of mortgage you select
  6. Current interest rates

Lenders will analyze your income in relation to your projected cost of the home and outstanding debts. This will determine the size loan you can borrow. Your housing expense-to-income ratio is determined by calculating your projected monthly housing expense, which consists of the principal and interest payment on your loan, property taxes and hazard insurance. The sum of these costs is referred to as "PITI."

Monthly homeowner association dues, if you're purchasing a condominium or townhouse, and private mortgage insurance are added to the PITI. Your housing income-to-expense ratio should fall in the 28 to 33 percent range. 28 percent of your gross monthly income is allotted toward PITI. 33 percent of you gross monthly income is allowed for PITI and all long term debt. Some lenders will go higher under certain circumstances.. Your total income-to-debt ratio should not exceed 34 to 38 percent of your gross income.

 

Question 2: How do I find out about the condition of the home I'm considering? Back to Top

First and foremost it is strongly recommended that you hire a professional person to inspect the home.

Also look for settling, sliding or soil problems, flooding or drainage problems.

People buying a condominium must be told about covenants, codes and restrictions or other deed restrictions, if the homeowners association has any authority over the subject property and ownership of common areas with others. Be sure to ask questions about anything that remains unclear or does not seem to be properly addressed by the forms provided to you.

Click to view a List of Home Inspectors in your area

 

Question 3: How low can I consider offering? Back to Top

There are always some sellers who for some reason must sell quickly, however in general, a very low offer in a normal market might be rejected immediately. In a strong buyer's market, the below-market offer will usually either be accepted or generate a counteroffer. If few offers are being made, an outright rejection of offers becomes unlikely. In a strong seller's market, offers are often higher than full price. While it is true that offers at or above full price are more likely to be accepted by the seller, there are other considerations involved:

    1. Is the offer conditional upon anything, such as the sale of the buyer's current house? If so, such an offer, even at full price, may not be as attractive as an offer without that condition.

    2. Is the offer made on the house "as is," or does the buyer want the seller to make some repairs before the closing or make a price concession instead?

    3. Is the offer all cash, meaning the buyer has waived the financing condition? If so, then an offer at less than the asking price may be more attractive to the seller than a full-price offer with a financing condition.

    4. Are there any requests for seller concessions? If so, the offer is not really full price.

     

Question 4: How and what do I negotiate? Back to Top

Different sellers price houses very differently. Some deliberately overprice, others ask for pretty close to what they hope to get and a few (maybe the cleverest) underprice their houses in the hope that potential buyers will compete and overbid. A seller's advertised price should be treated only as a rough estimate of what they would like to receive.

If possible try to learn about the seller's motivation. For example, a lower price with a speedy closing may be more acceptable to someone who must move quickly due to a job transfer. People going through a divorce or are eager to move into another home are frequently more receptive to lower offers.

Some buyers believe in making deliberate low-ball offers. While any offer can be presented to the seller, a low-ball offer often sours a prospective sale and discourages the seller from negotiating at all. And unless the house is extremely overpriced, the offer probably will be rejected anyway.

Before making an offer, also investigate how much comparable homes have sold for in the area so that you can determine whether the home is priced right.

 

Question 5: What about my down payment, should I put more or less down, if we can afford it? Back to Top

Various types of loan programs exist.

It may be more prudent to make a larger down payment and thereby reduce the amount of debt that must be financed. Once a buyer puts twenty percent or more as a down payment on their desired home, they will waive the requirement for mortgage insurance.

         SUBMIT: logo_cmhc.gif        Click on the Link to find out if you are ready to buy

 

Question 6: What is the irrevocability of the offer? Back to Top

The length of time you give the seller to consider your offer. Usually 48 hours or less.

 

Question 7: What steps should I take when looking for a home loan? Back to Top

It is strongly recommended that home buyers are prequalified or pre-approved for a loan as their first step in the process. By being prequalified, a buyer knows exactly how much house they can afford. They can make more informed decisions in the market place. This does not mean they will definitely get the loan because their credit reports, wages and bank statements still need to be verified before you can receive a commitment from the lender for the loan.

Almost all mortgage lenders prequalify people at no charge. Many of them will even do it on the internet. In order to be pre-approved, an application will be taken. For a fee, your credit report will be pulled, your employment and income will be verified, your checking and savings accounts will also be verified. In other words, all the necessary documentation will be completed in order for you to obtain a loan. The only things remaining will be for you to find a home, obtain an appraisal on it to prove its value to the bank and perform whatever inspections you may want on the property. This process considerably shortens the time frame to closing.

 

Question 8: Is it possible to negotiate interest rates? Back to Top

Compare the mortgage charts published in most newspapers.

Occasionally some lenders are willing to negotiate on both the loan rate and the number of points. This isn't typical among many of the established lenders who set their rates. Nevertheless, it never hurts to shop around, know the market and try to get the best deal. Always look at the combination of interest rate and points and get the best deal possible. This is reflected in what is called the APR or Actual Percentage Rate.

The interest rate is much more open to negotiation on purchases that involve seller financing. Generally, these are based on market rates but some flexibility exists when negotiating such a deal.

 

Question 9: Is it better to buy a new home or a resale? Back to Top

Sales price increases in either type of housing are strongly tied to location, growth in the local housing market and the state of the overall economy.

Some people feel that buying into a new-home community is a bit riskier than purchasing a house in an established neighborhood. Future appreciation in value in either case depends upon many of the same factors. Others believe that a new home is less risky because things won't "wear out" and need replacement.

"Existing homes have been appreciating a little more than new homes but every once in awhile they're at the same level and sometimes the new home prices go up a little quicker" according to the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR).

 

Question 10: Fixer-Uppers - Are they good or bad? Back to Top

Distressed properties or fixer-uppers can be found everywhere. These properties are poorly maintained and have a lower market value than other houses in the neighborhood. It is often recommended that buyers find the least desirable house in the best neighborhood. You must consider if the expenses needed to bring the value of that property to its full potential market value are within your budget. Most buyers should avoid run-down houses that need major structural repairs. Remember the movie " The Money Pit?" Those properties should be left to the builder or tradesman normally engaged in the repair business.

 

Question 11: Can you borrow the money to repair? Back to Top

Yes, purchasing a fixer-upper or power of sale may require repairs such as: a new heating system, roof, replacement windows, etc. You may then also finance additional repairs and improvements i.e.: new carpeting, kitchen cabinets, appliances, etc. You must of course "qualify" for the total amount you will be borrowing .

 

Question 12: Is there a good "return" for my efforts? Back to Top

Remodeling a home improves its livability and enhances curb appeal, making it more saleable to potential buyers. Some of the popular improvement projects are updated kitchens and baths, enlarged the master bedroom suite, home office additions and increased amenities in older homes.

You need to give your home every competitive advantage you can especially if you are selling an older home.  See the below link to find out how to get the best return on your renovation investment.  Be aware that some improvements may not increase the value to your home.  Before spending a lot of money on your home make sure you get the advice from your RE/MAX Chay Realty Inc. Realtor@

Click Here to find out Return on Reno Index 

 

  

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